Courageous Executives and the Permafrost

Last week I started to think about how different parts of an organisation have different views on what is important.

This is nothing new. Why should I keep reading?

I think the existence of that permafrost layer is problematic if want to be inventive or innovative. If you’re looking to evolve into a “courageous executive” then credibility associated with reducing that middle layer could be useful. However, to stand a chance of success when you “fight the machine”, you should pay attention to the basics, including:

  • the degree of effective support you’ll have,
  • the culture underpinning your sub-organisation, and
  • how different the “volumes” are when comparing your sub-organisation’s culture with the wider organisation’s culture.

In this context, “sub-organisation refers to the subset of the organisation under your sphere of influence, either formally via org chart or informally via your influence, credibility, relationships etc.

If you intend to create space for your organisation to innovate and experiment, then it’d be advantageous if it is more naturally innovative and experimental. That requires a different attitude to failure than when saving face is a preferred reaction to failure. To paraphrase, you’ve got to shrink that middle layer (conceptually).

A useful strategy that can reduce the size/significance of this middle layer is dealing with fear from a cultural standpoint. Something that can help the formulation of specific strategies is an understanding of how the Loss Aversion and Loss Attention cognitive biases manifest in the individuals that you identify as being significant anchor points in this middle layer.

  • Loss Aversion: It is better to not lose £10 than it is to find £10.
  • Loss Attention: Tasks that involve losses get more attention than tasks that do not.

A clue to something that seemed to help me is that bottom level. When this scenario was presented to delivery teams, they didn’t seem worried about saving face when faced with that hypothetical scenario. Digging further, it wasn’t that face/reputation was unimportant, it’s that they didn’t care all that much about what the “middle management types” thought about them (it’s how individuals seemed to interpret the scenario). That middle management group was not considered to be their judging community. They were far more concerned about their reputation amongst other delivery folks. For example, a developer might try and force a software library to work, applying workaround after workaround, instead of just accepting that the library was the wrong fit for what’s needed (because they wanted a reputation of being able to make anything work). However, that same developer might not be concerned if their boss’s peers don’t think much of them, if they don’t care about the office politics.

That got me thinking that perhaps one way of reducing that awkward middle layer, was to change their perceptions about what was important to the community that they considered was judging them. I think this is different to tackling their priorities head on, in that it’s less confrontational, so stands a better chance of working (at least partially). That middle layer would need to view organisationally significant things like money or time or customers etc. to be something that could be truly lost (so that their normal loss aversion and attention biases would influence them in ways that were beneficial, if you were indeed trying to grow into a courageous executive). They would also need to feel that personal reputation could not be lost in the same way.

Changes to that community can be as a result of external or internal pressures. Assuming you’re not “senior enough” to be able to enforce a new operating model the community must comply with, your more effective strategies would be the ones that originate from inside that community.

Potentially Useful Infiltration Techniques

  1. Repeated Messaging: Humans are influenced by exposure. The first time something controversial is heard, it’s shocking. After the hundredth time, it barely registers consciously. Interestingly though, the subconscious still registers. In that way, people can be programmed. By repeating your message regularly into the target community (and with variations to keep it interesting), over time you’ll lower resistance to your ideas.
  2. Let others get credit, even if the ideas are yours: Having others in the community get an endorphin rush when they share an idea influences them to repeat the behaviour. So it’s your idea really, so what? You’re aiming for something else. Besides, a few people will know anyway. That “inside knowledge” can be a powerful aide to your attempts at growing an organisational culture that has you as an executive – it creates a sense of belonging between you and them, which if nurtured can transform into loyalty.
  3. Be seen to be visible to the next few power levels up: For the hierarchically minded, seeing you playing nicely with their boss and their boss’s boss, can signal that it’s more acceptable for them to align with what you’re saying. It has a secondary effect to help you gauge whether or not what you want to do is palatable to the next few levels up the power structure. If it is, then it can be an indicator that there is space for you to grow your leadership potential.

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